A Lack of Sense and Sensibility at Sisters Cafe

Sisters Cafe-Confluence PAConfluence is one of the hidden gems of Pennsylvania’s Laurel Highlands region. Although a bit isolated today, in earlier times it was an important travel hub due to its location on the Turkeyfoot road and the Youghiogheny River. The Yough meets with the Casselman River and Laurel Hill Creek here, hence the name Confluence. The configuration of this confluence led to the name Turkeyfoot, which is how George Washington referred to the area as early as 1754 on one of his many trips through the area. Today Confluence is known primarily as a tourist destination for outdoor enthusiasts. It’s location on the Great Allegheny Passage brings many cyclists through the town and the Yough is famous for water sports. The damming of the river created the Youghiogheny River Lake, a popular boating destination and the sections above and below the lake offer whitewater rafting, canoeing and kayaking. The area is also known for its hunting and fishing. With all of the travelers to the area, I thought it might be time to check out some of the culinary options in town.

Sisters Cafe-Confluence PAFirst on my list was Sisters Cafe on Hugart Street in the middle of town. They bill themselves as “Specializing in home style-cooking” and that they serve breakfast all day. The cafe is located in a ’30’s era building with the original stamped tin ceilings, a fact which they note on their website. It’s too bad they installed banks of industrial fluorescent light fixtures on those vintage panels which completely negates the charm the ceiling may have added to the décor. In addition, nearly every surface of the interior is beige which further adds to the feeling of sitting in an office rather than a restaurant. Even the vintage cast ice cream stools at the counter were beige.

After seating myself, a friendly server arrived with the menu in a timely manner. The only item of a regional nature were the buckwheat cakes which were available seasonally. In addition, real maple syrup was available for an additional 75 cents. I also noticed a sign on the wall indicating they would not make pancakes during “peak times”. Really? You offer something on the menu but if you get too busy you won’t make it? I would suggest that if you can’t produce an item all of the time it shouldn’t be on the menu. I didn’t know whether it was “peak time” or not, so I just ordered the “#1 Hearty Breakfast” for $5.50 which included two eggs, home fries, sausage (links or patties) and toast. Although not excessively so, the wait for my meal was longer than I would have expected, indicating that perhaps they do have production issues in the kitchen. I could have excused the wait if the food was good, but I was sorely disappointed. I ordered the eggs over easy but they were almost hard with only the slightest amount of liquid yolk. In addition, they were crisp on the edges and had bits of carbonized food on them from a dirty grill. The sausage was three small links of a nondescript commercial brand that also had crunchy bits of grill scraps on them. The home fries were under seasoned but passable and the toast was your typical bland commercial variety.

There are several ways that restaurants can screw up food. Simple mistakes can happen, such as overcooking a steak or in this case eggs. Those kind of mistakes can be forgiven and won’t necessarily keep me from returning to a restaurant. However, when I’m served food with bits of burnt food on it, that I cannot forgive. Those mistakes are pure carelessness and demonstrate a lack of caring on the part of the restaurant. And if the restaurant doesn’t care, why should I?

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